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TonyTalbot

TonyTalbot

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Nicholas Nickleby
Charles Dickens, Mark Ford

3/5: The Fault in our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars - John Green

The cancer that seventeen-year-old Hazel survived left her lungs in tatters and tied to an oxygen bottle for the rest of her life – however long that may be. Her mother suggests she visits a support group, where she runs into Augustus Waters...

This has been at the edge of my reading-pile for at least two or three years now, and I finally picked it up. (One of the reasons I delayed was Becky's review (Here) where she rated it...okay. Didn't set the world on fire for her. I trust her judgement on books, which is why it's taken me so long. But I digress.)

The first thing I noticed when I was reading this – and I'm talking Chapter One – is that no teenager in the history of the world talks like Gus and Hazel. I'm a pretty smart guy; I've know some very smart people. I have never met ANYONE who used the word univalent in a sentence. No one. People simply don't talk like this. Hazel knows what an oncogene is; she knows the word hamartia; Why then, doesn't she know the word ontological?

Green seems determined to be obscure and borderline pretentious with his language and his characters, and they suffer because of it. Their conversations are superficial, for the most part; cocktail party debate on the breakfast-only nature of scrambled eggs.

I got very little from Hazel and Gus but mostly surfaces. It felt like I rarely saw the places where they lived and dreamt. Because of it, they're as superficial as the conversations they hold, and easily forgotten.

Fortunately, the dialogue settled down after a while and approached a normal level. Green definitely has different narrative voices for Gus and Hazel, there was no trouble telling them apart. His wordplay and love of puns makes the dialogue – when it does work – sparkle and shine. Make no mistake that Green is a smart guy...but he seems intent on preening his feathers and flapping his wings to show off.

There are moments which do work wonderfully well in the book. The trip to Amsterdam was the delight of the book, the real highlight. Making Hazel's favourite author a jerk was a masterstroke: After all, you should never meet your heroes – they'll never live up to your expectations. And because Green wasn't too worried about showing off with the author, he's the most realistic character in the book.

There's a character dies in this – no spoilers as to whom – and another character goes to their funeral. I'm pretty sure...no, I'm definitively sure...that Green never went to a funeral when he was seventeen of anyone close to him. I did. And there's no way you would act the way the character did when they were there. You don't have the mental capacity, for a start. You're certainly not going to fire off witty replies to people who post on a dead characters Facebook page.

An intriguing read, but it lost its way somewhere with an author determined to show off and not let his characters do the walking and the talking.